Blackman Forest Bells Fund

The trustees of the GCT voted unanimously to establish

the Blackman Forest Bells Fund in honor of Arthur Blackman

We are grateful indeed to the many friends and fans of Arthur Blackman, our beloved former trustee.  Donations made last year in his honor, including his own generous bequest from his estate, have enabled us to create the Blackman Forest Bells Fund. This fund will pay to for the upkeep and restoration of the Forest Bells, located in the forest of the Blackman Field and Woods property.

Blackman Land

If a man rings a bell in the forest and no one is there, does it make a sound?

Posted by Groton Conservation Trust on Sunday, March 9, 2014

The Forest Bells were created by local artist and craftsman Paul Matisse in 1995, commissioned by the inaugural Artist’s Valentine project, and installed on land owned by Arthur and Camilla Blackman.  The Blackmans donated the land to the GCT in 2000, and the Trust has been the steward of the land and bells since then.

You may remember a story from a couple of years ago on the much needed maintenance on the bells. The project takes the special talents and skills of craftsmen, and in the past the restoration has been a collective, donated effort.

This fund will ensure future generations will have the bells to discover and enjoy by providing the income necessary to keep the bells maintained.

If you would like to visit, take Old Ayer Road south toward Ayer from Main Street near the Mobil Station.  Then, turn left onto Indian Hill Road and go all the way to the end.  Park cars, but not near the house at the end.  Walk back to the end and bear left up a dirt road into the trees.  Continue along this road, passing at one point under power lines and continuing down into forest.  At the next obvious fork, with the main path going up to the right, turn sharp left on to the side road.  About 50 yards later there are a group of fallen trees barring an old road leading uphill to the right.  Walking over or around the fallen trees, follow that road up the hill.  Continue until you find yourself in a grove of hemlocks, quite different from the pines and oaks all around.  You are at the Forest Bells.

And if you visit, film your composition and submit it to us and we will update this page with your tune.  FYI: Winter is a great time to visit!